HomeFeaturesDisplay

Learning Some Cold Truths

Nearly all of the technology in many of the world's most ubiquitous electronic devices can be traced to a single, taxpayer-funded source: the US Department of Defense. What some people don't know is a lot of engineering also can be traced back to the DoD. The Permafrost tunnels, originally created to test arctic survival has become a critical asset in developing long-lasting infrastructure in the arctic.

The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.

The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.

Fort Meade, MD --

 

Hidden in the hills of Fairbanks, Alaska, the Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. Originally the tunnels were built to be used in a Cold War experiment to test the protective capabilities of permafrost.




However, scientists quickly discovered the tunnel would be valuable for studying geology, paleontology and a variety of engineering, mining and construction techniques specific to frozen environments.

Studying the 40,000-year-old frozen environment has allowed engineers to better understand the characteristics of permafrost and develop techniques to build long lasting structures in an Arctic environment.


The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.
The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.
The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.
Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility
The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility near Fairbanks, Alaska acts as an active laboratory allowing scientists to monitor and study permafrost in its natural state and how permafrost is changing in a warming climate. 3d illustration by Travis Burcham.
Photo By: Travis Burcham
VIRIN: 191213-D-HR740-9901





 

Feature Directory

Redirecting...


 

Social Media