Airframe: The F-16 Fighting Falcon

The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a compact, multi-role fighter aircraft. It is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack. It provides a relatively low-cost, high-performance weapon system for the United States and allied nations. The F-16A, a single-seat model, first flew in December 1976. The first operational F-16A was delivered in January 1979 to the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)

F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)

F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)

F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)

F-16 Fighting Falcons
(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Rasheen Douglas)

F-16 Fighting Falcons (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Rasheen Douglas)

The Automatic Ground-Collision Avoidance System (Auto-GCAS) could significantly reduce the incidence of controlled flight into terrain aircraft accidents is currently being integrated into the flight control systems of the U.S. Air Force's fleet of F-16 fighter aircraft.
The new software, pioneered by a partnership between the Office of the Undersecretary for Personnel and Readiness, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, the Air Force Test Center (AFTC) and Lockheed Martin, is expected to have application to a wide variety of civil and military aircraft. (NASA photo)

The Automatic Ground-Collision Avoidance System (Auto-GCAS) could significantly reduce the incidence of controlled flight into terrain aircraft accidents is currently being integrated into the flight control systems of the U.S. Air Force's fleet of F-16 fighter aircraft. The new software, pioneered by a partnership between the Office of the Undersecretary for Personnel and Readiness, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, the Air Force Test Center (AFTC) and Lockheed Martin, is expected to have application to a wide variety of civil and military aircraft. (NASA photo)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 555th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron takes off on a combat sortie from Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Sept. 6, 2015. The F-16 is a multi-role fighter aircraft that is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air and air-to-ground combat. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 555th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron takes off on a combat sortie from Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Sept. 6, 2015. The F-16 is a multi-role fighter aircraft that is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air and air-to-ground combat. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

A Royal Norwegian Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon prepares for a refuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to Royal Air Force Station Mildenhall, England, during a training sortie Sept. 5, 2014, over Norway. The KC-135 was part of a four-ship which enables tankers to provide concentrated aerial refueling support for large forces during major operations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christine Griffiths)

A Royal Norwegian Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon prepares for a refuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to Royal Air Force Station Mildenhall, England, during a training sortie Sept. 5, 2014, over Norway. The KC-135 was part of a four-ship which enables tankers to provide concentrated aerial refueling support for large forces during major operations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christine Griffiths)

A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off Sept. 25, 2014, during Distant Frontier at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-16 is assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron. Aggressor pilots are trained to act as opposing forces in Red Flag-Alaska, to prepare U.S. and allied forces for real-world aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jim Araos)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 20

An F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off Sept. 25, 2014, during Distant Frontier at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-16 is assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron. Aggressor pilots are trained to act as opposing forces in Red Flag-Alaska, to prepare U.S. and allied forces for real-world aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jim Araos)

The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 20

The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)

Thunderbirds Diamond Formation pilots perform the Bottom Up Pass during the Wings Over North Georgia Air Show in Rome, Ga. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez/U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds Public Affairs)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 20

Thunderbirds Diamond Formation pilots perform the Bottom Up Pass during the Wings Over North Georgia Air Show in Rome, Ga. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez/U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds Public Affairs)

Two F-16C Fighting Falcons release flares while conducting low-level combat training during the Coronet Cactus exercise near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. The F-16s are assigned to the , assigned to the 182nd Fighter Squadron. This exercise provides realistic combat training for student fighter pilots from air-to-air combat to dropping inert and live ordnance. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder/3rd Combat Camera Squadron)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 13 of 20

Two F-16C Fighting Falcons release flares while conducting low-level combat training during the Coronet Cactus exercise near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. The F-16s are assigned to the , assigned to the 182nd Fighter Squadron. This exercise provides realistic combat training for student fighter pilots from air-to-air combat to dropping inert and live ordnance. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder/3rd Combat Camera Squadron)

A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 14 of 20

A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

Four generations and over 70 years of U.S. Army Air Corps / U.S. Air Force air superiority, and the technological leaps that maintained it, are represented by a single formation of an F-22 "Raptor", F-86 "Sabre", F-16 "Fighting Falcon" and a P-51D "Mustang" during the Heritage Flight Training Course at Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Ariz., Mar 5, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 15 of 20

Four generations and over 70 years of U.S. Army Air Corps / U.S. Air Force air superiority, and the technological leaps that maintained it, are represented by a single formation of an F-22 "Raptor", F-86 "Sabre", F-16 "Fighting Falcon" and a P-51D "Mustang" during the Heritage Flight Training Course at Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Ariz., Mar 5, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.)

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly the Delta formation over Falcon Stadium during the U.S. Air Force Academy graduation ceremony. The flyover marks the first return of the Thunderbirds to Colorado Springs since sequestration last year. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds Public Affairs)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 16 of 20

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly the Delta formation over Falcon Stadium during the U.S. Air Force Academy graduation ceremony. The flyover marks the first return of the Thunderbirds to Colorado Springs since sequestration last year. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds Public Affairs)

F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 162nd Wing, Tucson, Arizona fly over an training range on April 8, 2015. The 161st Wing manages a fleet of more than 70 F-16 C/D and Mid-Life Update Fighting Falcons. There are three flying squadrons and numerous maintenance units assigned to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 17 of 20

F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 162nd Wing, Tucson, Arizona fly over an training range on April 8, 2015. The 161st Wing manages a fleet of more than 70 F-16 C/D and Mid-Life Update Fighting Falcons. There are three flying squadrons and numerous maintenance units assigned to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon returns to Nellis Air Force Base after flying a mission designed to prepare Combat Air Force's joint and allied aircrews for tomorrow's victories through challenging, realistic threat replication, training, test support, academics, and feedback. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 18 of 20

An F-16 Fighting Falcon returns to Nellis Air Force Base after flying a mission designed to prepare Combat Air Force's joint and allied aircrews for tomorrow's victories through challenging, realistic threat replication, training, test support, academics, and feedback. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 64th Aggressor Squadron approaches Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada after completing an exercise Red Flag mission. The 64th Aggressor Squadron prepares the combat Air Force's joint and allied aircrews for tomorrow's victories through challenging, realistic threat replication, training, test support, academics, and feedback.   (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 19 of 20

An F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 64th Aggressor Squadron approaches Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada after completing an exercise Red Flag mission. The 64th Aggressor Squadron prepares the combat Air Force's joint and allied aircrews for tomorrow's victories through challenging, realistic threat replication, training, test support, academics, and feedback. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

Two F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to the Alabama Air National Guard's 187th Fighter Wing approach a tanker during an aerial refueling mission over Nevada during exercise Green Flag-West 13-02. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 20 of 20

Two F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to the Alabama Air National Guard's 187th Fighter Wing approach a tanker during an aerial refueling mission over Nevada during exercise Green Flag-West 13-02. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Fort Meade, MD --


The F-16 Fighting Falcon, originally developed by General Dynamics (now Lockheed-Martin), is a proven compact, single-engine, multi-role fighter aircraft. Since the F-16A’s first flight in December 1976, this highly maneuverable air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack aircraft has provided mission versatility and high-performance for the U.S. and allied nations at a relatively low-cost.



 

In an air combat role, the F-16’s maneuverability and combat radius (distance it can fly to enter air combat, stay, fight and return) exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter.

In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles (860 kilometers), deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft, and return to its starting point. An all-weather capability allows it to accurately deliver ordnance during non-visual bombing conditions.

The U.S. Air Force officially named the F-16 “Fighting Falcon” on July 21, 1980, during a ceremony at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, the home of the first F-16 unit.

The F-16V, or Viper, is the latest variant of the F-16 fourth-generation fighter aircraft. The upgrade integrates advanced capabilities to better interoperate with fifth-generation fighters, such as the F-35 Lightning II and the F-22 Raptor.

The last F-16 was delivered to the U.S. Air Force on 18 March 2005. The F-35 was developed to replace the F-16.
 

An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
An F-16 Fighting Falcon goes through final inspection at the end of the runway before flying an exercise Red Flag 15-2 training mission.(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)
Photo By: Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen
VIRIN: 180212-F-XX999-9002

DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN

The first operational F-16A was delivered in January 1979 to the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Hill AFB.

The F-16 was built under an agreement between the U.S. and four NATO countries: Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Norway. These countries jointly produced with the U.S. an initial 348 F-16s for their air forces.

The consortium’s F-16s are assembled from components manufactured in all five countries. Belgium also provides final assembly of the F100 engine used in the European F-16s.

Recently, Portugal joined the consortium. The long-term benefits of this program will be technology transfer among the nations producing the F-16, and a common-use aircraft for NATO nations. Additionally, the program increases the supply and availability of repair parts in Europe and improves the F-16’s combat readiness.


F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)
F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)
F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 35th and 80th Fighter Squadrons of the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea; the 4th Fighter Squadron of the 388th Expeditionary Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; and the 38th Fighter Group of the ROK Air Force demonstrate an 'Elephant Walk' as they taxi down the flightline at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Dec. 14, 2012. The Elephant Walk was a demonstration of U.S. and ROK air force capabilities and strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler/Released)
Photo By: Staff Sgt. Jonathan Fowler
VIRIN: 180212-F-XX999-9006

All F-16s delivered since November 1981 have built-in structural and wiring provisions and systems architecture that permit expansion of the multirole flexibility to perform precision strike, night attack and beyond-visual-range interception missions.

This improvement program led to the F-16C and F-16D aircraft, which are the single- and two-seat counterparts to the F-16A/B, and incorporate the latest cockpit control and display technology. All Air Force units have converted to the F-16C/D.

Avionics systems include a highly accurate enhanced global positioning and inertial navigation systems, or EGI, in which computers provide steering information to the pilot. The plane has UHF and VHF radios plus an instrument landing system. It also has a warning system and modular countermeasure pods to that can be used against airborne or surface electronic threats. The fuselage also has space for additional avionics systems.

The cockpit and its bubble canopy give the pilot unobstructed forward and upward vision and greatly improved vision over the side and to the rear.

The F-16’s incredible maneuverability is achieved by its “relaxed stability” design. The airframe is inherently unstable, as the center of mass and lift are much closer together than on other designs, however this allows the aircraft to respond quickly to pilot control input and with tighter maneuvers.

While a fully analog jet aircraft of this design would require the pilot to make too many control inputs to fly safely, the F-16 pilot maintains excellent flight control through the aircraft’s “fly-by-wire” system.

The YF-16 became the world’s first aircraft to be aerodynamically unstable by design. With a rearward center of gravity, its natural tendency is to nose up rather than down. Level flight is created by the elevator pushing the tail up rather than down, and therefore pushing the entire aircraft up. With the elevator working with the wing rather than against it, wing area, weight, and drag are reduced.

The airplane is constantly on the verge of flipping up or down totally out of control. This tendency is being constantly caught and corrected by the fly-by-wire control system so quickly that neither the pilot nor an outside observer can tell. If the control system were to fail, the aircraft would instantly tumble; however, this has never happened.

Through a side stick controller, the pilot sends electrical signals to actuators of flight control surfaces, such as ailerons and rudder, while powerful onboard computers constantly adjust those inputs to enable stability in level flight and high maneuverability in combat. The side stick controller, in lieu of a center-mounted stick, allows the pilot easy and accurate control during high G-force combat maneuvers.

In designing the F-16, advanced aerospace science and proven reliable systems from other aircraft such as the F-15 and F-111 were selected. These were combined to simplify the airplane and reduce its size, purchase price, maintenance costs and weight. The lightweight of the fuselage is achieved without reducing its strength. With a full load of internal fuel, the F-16 can withstand up to nine G’s, nine times the force of gravity, which exceeds the capability of other current fighter aircraft.
 

F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)
F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)
F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
F-16 Fighting Falcons.(U.S. Air Force photo)
Photo By: U.S. Air Force
VIRIN: 180212-F-XX999-9001

OPERATION AND DEPLOYMENT

More than 4,000 F-16’s are in service in 24 countries. There are 110 different versions of the aircraft. The main user of the F-16 is the U.S. The country with the largest F-16 fleet outside the U.S. is Israel. The four European Participating Forces

who developed the midlife update for the F-16 are the Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Denmark and later also Portugal. Other users of the F-16 are Bahrain, Chile, Egypt, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Venezuela, United Arabian Emirates and South Korea.

U.S. Air Force F-16s were deployed to the Persian Gulf in 1991 in support of Operation Desert Storm, where more sorties were flown than with any other aircraft. These fighters were used to attack airfields, military production facilities, Scud missiles sites and a variety of other targets.

During Operation Allied Force, U.S. Air Force F-16 multirole fighters flew a variety of missions to include suppression of enemy air defense, offensive counter air, defensive counter air, close air support and forward air controller missions. Mission results were outstanding as these fighters destroyed radar sites, vehicles, tanks, MiGs and buildings.

Since Sept. 11, 2001, the F-16 has been a major component of the combat forces committed to the war on terrorism flying thousands of sorties in support of operations Noble Eagle (Homeland Defense), Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Iraqi Freedom.
 

The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)
The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)
The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
The goal of F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft mechanics with the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard, is to keep their aircraft in the air and contributing to the Air Force mission of flying, fighting and winning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Val Gempis)
Photo By: Val Gempis
VIRIN: 180212-F-TR874-9011

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Many military pilots refer to the F-16 as the “Viper”, because of its similarities to the head of the snake.

  • The F-16 was the first fighter jet to use a side-mounted control stick. The stick lets pilots rest their arm while flying, giving them better control of the jet in high-G maneuvers.

  • With its high thrust-to-weight ratio, extreme maneuverability, and pilot ergonomics and visibility, the F-16 has been one of the most respected and feared fighter aircraft of the past 40 years.

  • In 1976, Tech. Sgt. Joseph A. Kurdel, photo sensor shop supervisor for the 1st Tactical Fighter wing, MacDill AFB, Florida, won the “Name-the-Plane Contest” with the name Fighting Falcon. He won a free dinner at the MacDill AFB NCO Mess.
     

A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)
A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)
A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
A KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to the 63rd Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 480th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, during a flying training deployment at Souda Bay, Greece, Feb. 2, 2016. The 63rd ARS operated out of Souda Bay Naval Air Station for the duration of the flying training deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano)
Photo By: Staff Sgt. Christopher Ruano
VIRIN: 180212-F-VS255-9019

FACT SHEET

Primary function: multirole fighter

Contractor: Lockheed Martin Corp.

Power plant: F-16C/D: one Pratt and Whitney F100-PW-200/220/229 or General Electric F110-GE-100/129

Thrust: F-16C/D, 27,000 pounds

Wingspan: 32 feet, 8 inches (9.8 meters)

Length: 49 feet, 5 inches (14.8 meters)

Height: 16 feet (4.8 meters)

Weight: 19,700 pounds without fuel (8,936 kilograms)

Maximum takeoff weight: 37,500 pounds (16,875 kilograms)

Fuel capacity: 7,000 pounds internal (3,175 kilograms); typical capacity, 12,000 pounds with two external tanks (5443 kilograms)

Payload: two 2,000-pound bombs, two AIM-9, two AIM-120 and two 2400-pound external fuel tanks

Speed: 1,500 mph (Mach 2 at altitude)

Range: more than 2,002 miles ferry range (1,740 nautical miles)

Ceiling: above 50,000 feet (15 kilometers)

Armament: one M-61A1 20mm multibarrel cannon with 500 rounds; external stations can carry up to six air-to-air missiles, conventional air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions and electronic countermeasure pods

Crew: F-16C, one; F-16D, one or two

Unit cost: F-16A/B , $14.6 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars); F-16C/D,$18.8 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)

Initial operating capability: F-16A, January 1979; F-16C/D Block 25-32, 1981; F-16C/D Block 40-42, 1989; and F-16C/D Block 50-52, 1994

Inventory: total force, F-16C/D, 1017


A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
F-16 Fighting Falcons
A weapons loader from the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron performs a post-flight check on an F-16 Fighting Falcon after its arrival in Iraq. The squadron deployed in support of Operation New Dawn and will provide close air support for more than 40,000 troops leaving Iraq by the end of the year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
Photo By: Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo
VIRIN: 180212-F-MJ260-9010




                                                                                                         

Feature Directory

Redirecting...


 

Social Media